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Video:How to Sew a Cute Laptop Sleeve

with Amelia Rosenthal

Now you can tote around your laptop in style with a custom-made carrying sleeve. See how to sew a laptop case with light padding from a yoga mat.See Transcript

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Transcript:How to Sew a Cute Laptop Sleeve

Hi, I'm Amelia Rosenthal. I'm a fashion designer with my own line called Vega, and today on About.com I'm going to show you how to make a laptop case very much like this one.

DIY Laptop Case Supplies

You'll need:
  • a yard of ironed fabric for the shell
  • a yard of ironed fabric for the liner
  • a used yoga mat for the padding
  • bias tape
  • sewable velcro
  • a marker
  • tape measure
  • large and small scissor
  • an L square
  • pins
  • a sewing machine
  • a laptop

Get the Laptop Case Measurements

We'll start with our tape measure to determine the length, the depth and the perimeter width of the laptop. Plug in these measurements into the following formulas to calculate the dimensions of the fabric rectangles you'll need.

Laptop Case Liner
length + one-half the depth+ 1 inch (for seam allowance)+ 1/2 inch( for give)
(14+3/4+1+1/2= 16 1/4) This will be the length of the liner rectangle
perimeter width + 1 inch (seam allowance) + 6.5 inch (for the flap) + 1/2 inch (for give)
(22+1+6 1/2+1/2 = 30) This will be the perimeter width of the liner rectangle

Shell
final measurements of the lining + 1/4 inch(accounts for the yoga mat padding)
(16 1/4+ 1/4= 16 1/2)
(30 +1/4= 30 1/4)

Yoga Mat Padding
length + 1/2 the depth + 1/2 inch (for give)
(14+ 3/4+1/2 =15 3/4)
perimeter width + 1/2 inch (for give)
(22+ 1/2= 22 1/2)

With your L square and marker measure and draw accurate rectangles of these dimensions on your liner, shell and padding. Then cut them out. We have our pieces, so let's put them together.

Sew the Laptop Case Lining

Lay out the lining right side up, measure 6 1/2 inches from one length edge and mark. Then fold the fabric to that point right sides together. Sew the edges together, using a straight stitch with a half inch seam allowance, then zigzag stitch both edges to keep them from fraying. Repeat the process with the shell fabric and when you're done, turn the shell envelope right-side-out.

Fit the Padding Into the Case

Fold the matting in half and fit it inside the shell. Fit the liner envelope into the folded yoga mat, and now it's time to sew our two envelopes together. This is where the bias tape comes in. To use it pin both edges together with the bias tape folded over where the fabric edges meet and straight stitch the very edge of the bias tape.

Sew the Laptop Case

It's time to prepare the fabric of the flap to be seamed. To do this, simply fold over an edge by half an inch and iron. Go along this way until you've ironed all four of the short and long edges of the flap fabric. Pin the liner and shell together along the prepared edges and at the corners.

And we're ready for the sewing machine. Sew the liner and shell flaps together using the straight stitch close to the edge, and reinforce these three seams with a small zigzag stitch Finally we get to the velcro.

Measure the velcro so that there is a half inch space between the velcro and all three edges. Snip off any extra, pin the velcro in place at both ends and once in the middle. Sew on the velcro along it's smooth edges with the straight stitch and it’s a good idea to reinforce the ends. Cut the fuzzy strip to the same size as the rough one and stick them together

Finish the DIY Laptop case

Place your laptop inside the case. Flip the flap over, and very carefully, starting at the ends, peel off bits of the fuzzy velcro and pin it to the body three times like before. Take out the laptop. It's time to affix the fuzzy strip of the velcro using a wide straight stitch.

So we're done. Let's see if the hard work paid off. It fits! And we have something we can be proud of that we made with our own hands. Thanks for visiting us. To learn more, check out About.com.
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