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Video:How to Do Herringbone Stitch

with Melissa Shippe

Herringbone stitch is a versatile, popular beading style. In this how-to video from About.com, beading expert and beadwork teacher Melissa Shippee demonstrates how to to herringbone stitch.See Transcript

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Transcript:How to Do Herringbone Stitch

Hi, I'm Melissa Shippe, owner of Wild Eye Designs. I'm here today with About.com to show you how to do herringbone stitch.

Tools You'll Need for Herringbone Stitch

You'll need a beading needle, beading thread and seed beads. Cylinder beads are on of the preferred materials because of their cylindrical shape.

How to Start Herringbone Stitch

To do flat herringbone stitch you'll start your first row by laddering together beads. Pick up the first two beads. Bring them down toward the end of your thread leaving just enough of a tail to put your needle on later, weave into your beadwork and trim. Stitch through the fist bead again. In a circular thread path. The two beads should sit right next to each other. Then stitch through the second bead. Pick up the next bead and stitch through the second bead in the same direction you last stitched through it. Then stitch through the third bead. Pick up your next bead. Stitch through the last bead. Then though the bead you just picked up.

The beads I have here would give me two ladders, to add the beads that will start my third latter, I pick up a bead, stitch through the last bead then through the bead I just picked up, pick up my last bead in the initial row, stitch through previous bead, then the bead I just picked up. This gives me my initial row of flat herringbone stitch.

How to Add Rows in Herringbone Stitch

To stitch the next row, I flip over my laddered row, pick up my first pair of beads that go on top of my first ladder, and I stitch down through the next bead from where my thread was emerging. So what I've just done is added a pair of beads on top of the first pair of beads in my initial row.

Then I reverse direction and stitch through the adjacent bead working down to the end of the row. I pick up my next pair of beads that go on top of my middle ladder, stitch on through the next bead, and up through the bead after that. So I've added a pair of beads on top my middle ladder, to add my pair of beads on top of my last ladder, I pick up a pair of beads, stitch down through the next bead, and then in order to turn around, to start the next row, I have to catch the thread underneath the bead I just stitched through, so I stitch over the thread, then back through the last two beads, to do my step-up to get ready to stitch the next row.

To continue you pick up a pair of beads, stitch down through the next bead, then up through the first bead in the next ladder. Pick up a pair of beads, stitch down through the next bead, then up through the first bead in the next ladder, at the end of the row I pick up my pair of beads, Stitch down through the next bead and I have to do my turn around and step-up so I have to catch a thread underneath the bead where my thread is emerging by stitching underneath it and then back through the last two beads to do my step-up.

Even rows end and odd rows are worked in opposite directions. When you finish a piece of beadwork you need to weave in your thread. There is no designated thread path to follow, just follow the thread path that already exists according to what stitch you're using. You'll then need to trim the thread to get rid of it. And that's how you do a herringbone stitch.

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